College of Veterinary Medicine |
theia

Healthy Animals, Healthy People, Healthy Planet

Theia, a 1-year-old bully breed mix

Theia
Sara Mellado of Moses Lake reunites with Theia – a stray, injured dog she took in and named – at WSU’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital. (Photos by Linda Weiford, WSU News)



  • Theia says goodbye to WSU's Veterinary Teaching Hospital


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  • Beaten dog leaves WSU vet hospital after successful surgery





  • Theia pm update 04/27/15


    Credit all photos to Henry Moore Jr. BCU/WSU

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    Theia prepares to enter the CT scan to confirm the placement of the stent in her sinuses completed last Friday 04/24/15.

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    Theia can clearly breathe freely through her nose and no longer has to breathe through her mouth after WSU veterinary surgeons opened her sinuses with a laser and placed a stent in the passageway to hold them open.

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    Theia still waits.

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    Theia gets sleepy after an injectable sedative was given to her before undergoing the
    repeat CT scan. The sedative is used so she will hold still to help provide the best images.

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    Theia is positioned before the CT scan begins.  Images showed the stent in her sinuses was in the same alignment where it was introduced and she has an open airway now.




  • Theia update 04/27/15


    Theia underwent a post-operative CT scan today at 11:30 a.m.  Photos and video were taken and are available below.  The short-story with no reservations at this time is Theia is doing well and will likely go home soon!  Her nasal passages are open and she breathes well through the stent placed to keep them open.  She can now sleep like a normal dog without opening her mouth and gasping.

    theia sagittal reconstruct preop




  • Theia Update 4/24/2015


    Theia in surgery photo cutlines

    All photos credit to Henry Moore Jr. BCU/WSU

    Burn Tissue
    WSU veterinary surgeons took Theia back to surgery late today April 24, 2015, to further open her sinus cavity and place the stent in the passageway.  Arrows show two areas where tissue was burned away with a laser.

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    The basket-like stent shown here was placed in Theia’s sinuses and expands to hold the tissue open.

    Stent in place
    This shows the end of the stent in Theia’s sinuses after expansion and before WSU veterinary surgeons withdrew the placement catheter.

    Stent x-ray
    Arrows indicate on x-rays, the faint wire mesh that constitutes the stent.  WSU veterinary surgeons were pleased with the placement and optimistic for Theia’s continued recovery.  Theia’s nose is oriented in the 2 o’clock position.




  • Theia's Update 4/22/2015


    Theia went to surgery this morning at 9:30 a.m.  Endoscopy of her sinuses on the side that had been crushed showed only a narrow passage, the diameter of perhaps a pencil lead, remaining.  A guide wire was passed through the opening and an inflatable catheter was threaded onto the wire.  When the catheter was inflated, it tore some of the scar tissue and opened the area.  Next a laser wand was inserted and scar tissue was ablated before surgeons took final measurements for a custom nasal stent to be installed later this week.  Surgery took almost three hours.

    She is resting comfortably this afternoon and breathing a little… through her nose again.



    Washington State University veterinary surgeon, Dr. Boel Fransson, holds a 3D model of the area of Theia’s skull against the dog as she is under general anesthesia.
    Washington State University veterinary surgeon, Dr. Boel Fransson, holds a 3D model of the area of Theia’s skull against the dog as she is under general anesthesia.  Theia’s sinuses were crushed by blows to the head in a failed attempt by someone to euthanize her.

    A 3D printed model of the area of Theia’s skull that suffered severe fractures.
    A 3D printed model of the area of Theia’s skull that suffered severe fractures.

    Veterinary internal medicine specialist Dr. Rance Sellon passes a flexible endoscope into Theia’s mouth to locate the point at which her sinuses normally drain into her throat.
    Veterinary internal medicine specialist Dr. Rance Sellon passes a flexible endoscope into Theia’s mouth to locate the point at which her sinuses normally drain into her throat.

    Endoscopic localization of Theia’s injured sinuses reveled an opening limited to the diameter of a pencil lead.  A blue colored coated guide wire shows the tight opening on the monitor.

    Endoscopic localization of Theia’s injured sinuses reveled an opening limited to the diameter of a pencil lead.  A blue colored coated guide wire shows the tight opening on the monitor.

    A fine wire protrudes from Theia’s nose (shown by arrows) moments before the WSU veterinary surgeon Dr. Boel Fransson puts slides inflatable catheter over it and guides it to the site of the sinus blockage.
    A fine wire protrudes from Theia’s nose (shown by arrows) moments before the WSU veterinary surgeon Dr. Boel Fransson puts slides inflatable catheter over it and guides it to the site of the sinus blockage. 

    WSU veterinary surgeon Dr. Boel Fransson tests the inflatable catheter before placing it in Theia’s sinuses to open the blockage.
    WSU veterinary surgeon Dr. Boel Fransson tests the inflatable catheter before placing it in Theia’s sinuses to open the blockage.

    Radiographs taken in surgery at Washington State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine

    Radiographs taken in surgery at Washington State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine show a candy cane-shaped flexible endoscopy in Theia’s mouth and at the point where her sinuses naturally drain into her throat.  A fine guide wire has been passed through her nose to meet the endoscope and an inflatable catheter has been threaded over it.  On the right-hand monitor, arrows show the constriction in Theia’s nasal passage that prevented her from breathing properly.  It was later opened with a medical laser.

    WSU’s veterinary surgery team watches as Dr. Boel Fransson begins to pass a rigid endoscope into Theia’s nose to localize the blockage and use a medical laser to develop a patent airway again.
    WSU’s veterinary surgery team watches as Dr. Boel Fransson begins to pass a rigid endoscope into Theia’s nose to localize the blockage and use a medical laser to develop a patent airway again.

    A video monitor shows the view from within Theia’s sinus where a clear fiber optic laser ablation wand is being used to cut tissue and open the airway.
    A video monitor shows the view from within Theia’s sinus where a clear fiber optic laser ablation wand is being used to cut tissue and open the airway.

    The WSU veterinary surgical team watches a video monitor while wearing protective eyewear while a medical laser is in use to open Theia’s sinuses.
    The WSU veterinary surgical team watches a video monitor while wearing protective eyewear while a medical laser is in use to open Theia’s sinuses.



  • Theia Update


    Theia-April-21Theia, the ownerless dog that a month ago was hit by a car, bludgeoned, and buried only to crawl out of its shallow grave four days later returned to Washington State University’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital this morning for reevaluation.

    The surgery team headed by Dr. Boel Fransson says the plan currently is to re-visualize the damage with two types of endoscopy.  Veterinary surgeons and internal medicine specialists working together will introduce a flexible endoscope (like a telescope) into her mouth and curl it back into the sinus cavity from the point where it naturally drains into her throat.  In the meantime, another part of the surgical team will use a small rigid endoscope and enter her nose.  Together, they hope to establish whether or not they can open the sinus with a minimum amount of additional trauma.

    For now, Theia is an active dog that would appear to the untrained eye to be normal.

    Her story will be featured tonight on KXLY, Channel 4 out of Spokane, Wash., and KLEW Channel 3, out of Lewiston, Idaho.

    Additional updates will follow tomorrow.




  • Beaten dog returns to WSU veterinary college for reassessment





  • In the Media





  • Theia's skull vs. Normal skull.


    Skull comparison side profile skull comparison



  • 3D images of Theia's CT scans






  • 'Miracle Dog' Survives Being Hit by Car, Clubbed, Abandoned


    TheiaApr 2, 2015 | New York Post | 'Miracle Dog' Survives Being Hit by Car, Clubbed, Abandoned

    SPOKANE, Wash. — The stray dog was hit by a car, clubbed in the head and left for dead in a ditch in Washington state. Days later, the 1-year-old bully breed mix showed up sickly and covered in dirt at a nearby farm. Now, the dog that defied death is recovering with the help of good Samaritans and veterinarians at Washington State University.

    Other sources:

    The Washington Post
    The New York Daily News
    TODAY Online
    USA Today
    The Seattle Times
    NBC Bay Area
    WPTV West Palm Beach
    10 News Tampa Bay
    News First Sri Lanka
    Examiner.com
    The Seattle P.I.
    The Moscow-Pullman Daily News
    The Tacoma News-Tribune
    The Tri-City Herald
    The Yakima Herald-Republic
    The Skagit Valley Herald
    The Columbian
    The Olympian
    KING5
    The Everett Herald
    CBS Seattle
    KATU
    KXLY-TV News
    Omidog.com
    ABC 13
    The Detroit News
    Georgia Newsday
    The Columbus Dispatch
    Daily Animal Care
    The Himalayan Times
    YAHOO! Australia
    Global News
    Time




  • Dog rose from the grave to live again





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