Veterinary Continuing Education
Spring Conference
March 22-24, 2024 | 12 CE credits

Spring Conference

March 22-24

Friday, Bustad Lecture at 5:00 PM

Saturday, 8 AM – 6 PM

Sunday, 8 AM – 12:15 PM

Join us in person for our annual weekend Veterinary Spring Conference. There will be a large and small animal track and a track for technicians & assistants. We encourage veterinarians, technicians, and assistants to attend.

This program offers 12 hours of continuing education credit.

  • Veterinarian: Base price $325.00 (Early Registration by March 11, 2024); Late Registration = $390.00
  • Technician: Base price $200.00 (Early Registration by March 11, 2024); Late Registration = $ 250.00
  • Additional cost per lab attended.

Friday, March 22

  • 4-5 PM – Registration in the Animal Disease Biotechnology Facility (ADBF) lobby
  • 5 pm –  Bustad Distinguished Lecture (ADBF 1002)
    • Lecturer: Phyliss Erdman, PhD
    • Title: The Human Animal Bond: A Critical Element in Veterinary Education
  • 6-7:30 PM – Bustad Lecture Reception in Bustad 134 (Hosted by WSVMA)

Saturday, March 23

Small animal track:

Location: Bustad Hall 145

  • 7 AM – Registration in the ADBF lobby
  • 8-10 AM – The Veterinary Practice of Excellence:  Doing the Common Things, Uncommonly Well! by Richard M. DeBowes, DVM, MS, Dipl ACVS
    Over the course of two presentations, we will look at the key learnings from the evaluation of nearly 100 veterinary practices.   We will look at why so many practices underperform and where owners and engaged team members should focus their time, talent and treasure in order to create the practice of their dreams.
  • 10 AM – Break, Bustad 134
  • 10:30 AM – Triage and Initial Approach to the Emergency Patient by Beth Davidow, DVM, DACVECC (guest speaker)
    Handling emergency patients is easier when your facility is prepared, and you have a step wise approach.  In this case-based presentation, we will discuss the components of practice readiness, the physiology of oxygen delivery, and the process of both primary and secondary assessment.  At the end of the presentation, you will have practical ideas and steps to make the next emergency case less scary.
  • 11:30 AM – What is New in Emergency Medicine? by Beth Davidow, DVM, DACVECC (guest speaker)
    Medicine is an ever-changing field.  In this lecture, we will discuss 4 common emergencies (allergic reactions, gastroenteritis, traumatic bleeding, and urethral obstructions) and what I do differently now than I did 5 years ago.
  • 12:30 PM – Lunch, Bustad 134
  • 1:30-3:30 PM – Small Animal Wound Management by Bonnie Campbell, DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACVS
    During these two presentations, we will discuss best practices in small animal wound management from start to finish. Topics will include proper debridement and lavage techniques, selection and application of moisture retentive dressings that speed healing, use of active suction drains and stents, and a variety of options for achieving tension-free wound closure. Clinical cases will be used throughout to show these techniques in action.
  • 3:30 PM – Break, Bustad 134
  • 4-6 PM – Antibiotic Stewardship by Claire Burbick, DVM, PhD, DACVM
    The two hours will be devoted to topics in antimicrobial use including a review of how to use AST data and changes in antimicrobial prescribing for UTIs and respiratory disease and trends in resistance bacteria and ongoing efforts to combat antimicrobial resistance.

Large animal track:

Location: Veterinary Teaching Hospital (VTH) 1410/1408

  • 8 AM – Burns Practical Assessment and Treatment by Elizabeth Woolsey, DVM (guest speaker)
    In 2015 225 thousand acres burned in 5 hours. At the time it was considered the fastest moving fire in recorded history. When the fire ended Elizabeth Woolsey Herbert was allowed entrance into the fire ravaged area to begin dealing with her client’s horses. She had no idea if many would survive due to the extreme injuries including coronary band oozing. Was it worth even trying to save these horses?And many of the owners lost all their infrastructure so how would they pay for the treatment and how could this be done on a budget?
  • 9 AM – Colic Practical Treatment When Referral Isn’t An Option (1.5 hrs) by Elizabeth Woolsey, DVM (guest speaker)
    It was not unusual to see large numbers of colic in the Adelaide Plains, The majority were impaction colics. How do you treat these horses on a budget when referral isn’t an option?
  • 10 AM – Break, Bustad 134
  • 10:30 AM – Standing Flank Laparotomy (30 MIN) by Elizabeth Woolsey, DVM (guest speaker)
    This lecture will discuss: 1. How to decide to do it and what you need (not much), 2. Preop prep and sedation/ local anesthesia, 3. The procedure and recovery, 4. A new way to relieve impactions without surgery!
  • 11 AM – Poisonous Plants That Are New And May Not Be Known To Your Area (30 MIN) by Elizabeth Woolsey, DVM (guest speaker)
  • 11:30 AM – WNV And Other Flaviviruses FUOs Our Experiences (30 MIN) by Elizabeth Woolsey, DVM (guest speaker)
    In 2017 two horses traveled ~4 hours to Adelaide Plains Equine Clinic with unusual neurological symptoms. This was the start of an outbreak of what the Australian government called a Kunjin virus. It was a variant of WNV. Elizabeth Woolsey saw ~50 cases with 5 deaths. How do you deal with the symptoms, diagnosis and aftermath?
  • 12 PM – Paying It Forward (30 MIN) by Elizabeth Woolsey, DVM (guest speaker)
    Elizabeth and several other practitioners contributed to a PowerPoint presentation for recent grads where ~ 250 practice tips are presented ranging from “how to’s” to “what to avoid”. She also started castration clinics for her clients and allowing vet students to perform part of the castrations. This was a popular activity with both clients and vet students.
  • 12:30 PM – Lunch, Bustad 134
  • 1:30 PM – Small Ruminant Parasite Management by Roselle Busch, DVM (guest speaker)
    Multiple approaches to management and control of parasites for sheep and goats.
  • 2:30 PM – Small Ruminant Herd Health & Abortions by Roselle Busch, DVM (guest speaker)
    A herd health program is the foundation to a healthy and productive flock. With practices in place it becomes more attainable to prevent and control abortions within various types of sheep and goat operations.
  • 3:30 PM – Break, Bustad 134
  • 4 PM – Small Ruminant Mastitis by Roselle Busch, DVM (guest speaker)
    Udder health and milk production is essential for all productive small ruminant operations. It is important to understand the common pathogens, transmission, and opportunities for control within dairy and range operations.
  • 5 PM – Small Ruminant Neonatal Care by Roselle Busch, DVM (guest speaker)
    Common presentations for sick kids and lambs within the first week of life. We will discuss practical methods for triage that we can teach our clients to increase the likelihood of a positive outcome.

Technician track:

Location: Animal Disease Biotechnology Facility (ADBF) 1002

  • 8 AM – Expecting the Unexpected- Triage for Success by Leslie Wereszczak, MS, LVMT, VTS (Emergency and critical care) (guest speaker)
    Emergencies are never scheduled and often happen at the most inopportune time.  Making sure the necessary supplies and equipment are readily available when an emergency presents can be the difference between life and death.   What should be in your ready kit and crash cart?
  • 9 AM – Catheter Crisis: Hitting the Hard to Hit by Leslie Wereszczak, MS, LVMT, VTS (Emergency and critical care) (guest speaker)
    IV access is a critical skill that enables veterinarians and technicians to administer life-saving fluids and medications. When vein options have been exhausted, or it just seems to be a bad vein day, this lecture will discuss a few tricks of the critical care trade to secure a line when you need it most.
  • 10 AM – Break, Bustad 134
  • 10:30 AM – Team Ready!  The Principles of RECOVER CPR by Leslie Wereszczak, MS, LVMT, VTS (Emergency and critical care) (guest speaker)
    In 2012, the Reassessment Campaign on Veterinary Resuscitation (RECOVER), was published.  These evidence-based veterinary specific CPR guidelines are designed to provide veterinary teams with standardized methods of performing CPR in an effort to improve survival outcomes.  This lecture highlights the clinical guidelines of RECOVER to help teams improve readiness and performance when cardiopulmonary resuscitation is needed.
  • 11:30 AM – The Solution to Pollution is Dilution, Or Is It?  Management of the Toxicology Patient by Leslie Wereszczak, MS, LVMT, VTS (Emergency and critical care) (guest speaker)
    Knowing how to appropriately handle common toxicological emergencies is critical to a positive outcome.  This lecture will discuss common toxins and appropriate treatment from decontamination to mechanical ventilation.
  • 12:30 PM – Lunch, Bustad 134
  • 1:30 PM – “Comfortably Numb” Epidurals and Brachial Plexus Blocks by Shona Meyer, BS, LVT, VTS (Anesthesia/Analgesia)
    Practical techniques for epidural and brachial plexus blocks in small animal patients, using materials any practice could affordably have on hand.
  • 2:30 PM – What Next? How to Treat Pain when NSAIDs are not the Solution? by Lori Lutskas, LVT, CCRP
    We will be exploring the pain pathway and looking at alternative to non-steroidal (Rimadyl) to manage chronic pain such as osteoarthritis.   We will look at the Assisi Loop, Pulse Electromagnetic Field therapy, pharmaceutical such as low dose Ketamine, Solensia, and Librela.
  • 3:30 PM – Break, Bustad 134
  • 4-6 PM – LAB: “Comfortably Numb” Wet Lab (Technician only) by Shona Meyer, BS, LVT, VTS (Anesthesia/Analgesia)
    You MUST register for this lab! Practical techniques for epidural and brachial plexus blocks in small animal patients, using materials any practice could affordably have on hand.  This lab session will be hands on learning of these techniques.
  • 4 PM – Equine Dental Case Studies by Teri R. Olson, LVT
    This lecture will discuss: 1. Learn more about EOTRH, 2. Learn when to get help with tough cases, 3. Know what normal dentition is to recognize abnormal.
  • 5 PM – The Key to Living HOPPILY Ever After.  Basic Facts and Care of Exotic Mammals. by Alexis Adams, LVT
    This lecture will be an overview of the most common exotic mammals that can Hopp through your clinic doors, reasons they come into the clinic and husbandry considerations.

Sunday, March 24

Small animal track:

Location: Bustad Hall 145

  • 8 AM – Diagnostic Techniques Used by Dermatologists by David D. Duclos, DVM, Diplomate ACVD (guest speaker)
    This lecture will discuss: 1. What are the 3 basic things you need to make a dermatologic diagnosis, 2. Understand how to do skin scrapings and how to take samples for cytology, 3. When to take a biopsy, and when and what to culture?
  • 8 AM-NOON – LAB: Wound Lab (DVM ONLY) by Bonnie Campbell
    You MUST register for this lab! This lab is designed for the veterinarian who wants to enhance their efficiency and efficacy in wound management. Procedures practiced in lab include debridement and lavage, selecting the right moisture retentive dressing for a wound, and tension-relieving wound closure techniques such as undermining, walking sutures, releasing incisions, stenting, closing oddly-shaped wounds, eliminating dog-ears, subdermal plexus flaps (sliding advancement flaps, H-plasty, and transposition flap), and drain placement. Lab attendees should attend the corresponding wound management lectures on Saturday. Through practice on models and cadavers, and individual feedback from instructors, you will expand the repertoire of techniques you can confidently offer to your patients.
  • 9 AM – How To Work Up A Pruritic Patients by David D. Duclos, DVM, Diplomate ACVD (guest speaker)
    This lecture will discuss: 1. What are the 3 patterns of pruritus – Atopy, Scabies, Flea allergy, 2. What clinical lesion is very suggestive of pemphigus, 3. What dermatologic conditions could also affects other pets or people?
  • 10 AM – Break, Bustad 134
  • 10:15 AM-12:15 PM – Diseases That Cause Pododermatitis In Dogs And Cats by David D. Duclos, DVM, Diplomate ACVD (guest speaker)
    This presentation will focus on: 1. What diseases cause comedones, 2. What diseases cause paw pad hyperkeratosis, 3. What disease causes claw abnormalities, 4. What disease in an older dog causes depigmentation, 5. What disorder results in marked paw pad hyperkeratosis in older dogs, 6. What lesion both on cytology and biopsy is diagnostic for pemphigus?

Large animal track:

Location: Veterinary Teaching Hospital (VTH) 1410/1408

  • 8 AM – Hive Inspections 101: Step-By-Step Approach to Honeybee Health Management by Melissa Holahan, DVM, DACVECC (guest speaker)
    This seminar will be covering the six (6) steps to performing a complete hive inspection. We will review hive equipment, hive location and the best practices for maintaining biosecurity between colonies and apiaries. Tips and tricks on how to get comfortable working with bees and how to maintain a valid VCPR with your local beekeeper.
  • 9 AM – Becoming a Honeybee Vet Expert: Common Diseases Seen in the Hive by Melissa Holahan, DVM, DACVECC (guest speaker)
    This seminar will take a case-based approach to some of the most common honeybee diseases that we can see during colony inspections. A detailed review of each disease/condition will be given and include the best practices for diagnosis/treatment. We will take a more in depth look at the devastation that varroa mites can bring on honeybee colonies and steps to keep mite counts low.
  • 10 AM – Break, Bustad 134
  • 10:15 AM – Equine Neonatology – Common Emergencies and When to Refer by Erin Pinnell, DVM, MS
    Our smallest patients can present with the biggest problems. In this session, we will review the most common equine neonate emergencies. We will discuss conditions that may be managed in the field and how to decide when it is time for referral.
  • 11:15 AM – Post-partum Complications in Mares: Part 1- The Colicky Mare by Zuzanna Pietras, DVM
    In preparation for foaling season, we will review differentials for the colicky post-partum mare, as well as practical advice for management of the mare on the farm and when referral is recommended.
  • 11:45 AM – Post-partum Complications in Mares: Part 2 – The Retained Placenta by Babiche Heil, DVM, MS, Dip ACT
    Retained fetal membranes are seen in 4 – 10% of equine foalings, up to 40% in some breeds. Unlike in ruminants, this condition can lead to life-threatening complications in the horse. The occurrence, pathophysiology and treatment of this condition will be discussed ensuring that every practitioner can attend mare with retained membranes and feels confident treating her.

Technician track:

Location: Animal Disease Biotechnology Facility (ADBF) 1002

  • 8 AM – Parasites in Dogs and Cats by Barbie M. Papajeski, MS, LVT, RLATG, VTS (Clinical Pathology) (guest speaker)
    In this lecture, we will discuss the common parasites found in dogs and cats including sampling, testing, and recognition of diagnostic stages
  • 9 AM – What Do I Say? Educating Clients About Their Animal’s Parasitology Results by Barbie M. Papajeski, MS, LVT, RLATG, VTS (Clinical Pathology) (guest speaker)
    In this session, we will continue the discussion of how to approach client education with parasitology results.
  • 10 AM – Break, Bustad 134
  • 10:10 AM – Do You See What I See? Interactive Microscope Identification by Barbie M. Papajeski, MS, LVT, RLATG, VTS (Clinical Pathology) (guest speaker)
    In this session, participants will have an opportunity to test their identification skills of microscopic elements in blood, cytology, and urine samples.
  • 11:10 AM – Avoiding Burnout and Looking for Advancement Opportunities:  VTS Career Options by Barbie M. Papajeski, MS, LVT, RLATG, VTS (Clinical Pathology) (guest speaker)
    In this session, we will discuss the pathways to a VTS and other career options

Questions about the WSU Veterinary Spring Conference?

 Contact us via email or 509-335-1198 or contact Katy Heaton at 509-335-8221.